Keyword: "medication adherence"

7 items were found with the keyword "medication adherence".

  • My Mobile Advice Program (MyMAP)

    PI: Jennifer B. McClure, PhD

    Smoking is a leading cause of death in the US, killing more than 440,000 people a year. While effective treatments exist, their impact is significantly reduced by poor treatment adherence, particularly to pharmacotherapy. One way to improve the effectiveness of existing pharmacotherapy and to help more people stop smoking is to enhance treatment adherence. The current study develops and pilot tests a prototype My Mobile Advice Program (MyMAP). MyMAP is designed to a) provide real-time, algorithm-driven, personalized guidance to smokers' regarding how to manage common, non-serious, bothersome medication side-effects and nicotine withdrawal symptoms, b) provide patients with timely, individually-tailored, supportive encouragement to enhance their motivation for quitting and promote better adherence to their prescribed treatment regimen; c) alert providers to potentially serious adverse events or persistent bothersome symptoms that warrant timely medical intervention; and d) provide patients and providers 24/7 access to relevant educational and behavioral self-help information that can either be viewed online (via computer or smart phone) or printed for reference. Through this comprehensive web-based intervention, we hypothesize that MyMAP will promote treatment adherence, thereby ultimately improving cessation rates and treatment cost-effectiveness. Given the popularity, high frequency of bothersome, non-serious medication side-effects, and increased monitoring demands for varenicline use, the pilot prototype is designed to support varenicline pharmacotherapy, but if the proposed intervention strategy proves promising, MyMAP will be expanded to support nicotine replacement and bupropion use in the future. (07/01/2013 - 06/30/2015)

  • Puff City II Dissemination

    PI: Christine L. M. Joseph, PhD, MPH

    Puff City is a successful asthma management program for urban teenagers in Detroit high schools. This project allows us to make the most current version of Puff City available to anyone in the community with access to the internet. (01/01/2010 - 12/31/2010)

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  • iSTART

    PI: Emily MacDonald Fredericks, PhD

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressant medications is common among adolescent liver transplant recipients, and is a leading cause of chronic rejection and graft loss, particularly following the transfer from pediatric to adult-centered transplant care. There is a critical need to promote medication adherence in this high risk group. The objective of this project is to design and evaluate a tailored intervention delivered using web-based and cellphone text messages to promote medication adherence in adolescent liver transplant recipients who are transitioning from pediatric to adult-centered transplant care. The iSTART (Individualized Self-management Training for Adolescent/Young Adult Recipients of Transplantation) intervention is delivered using technology to reduce the time and access constraints often encountered with traditional adherence interventions. (11/01/2009 - 08/31/2016)

  • Puff City II - Rural Georgia

    PI: Martha S. Tingen, MSN, PhD

    Puff City Rural Georgia takes the existing Puff City II intervention and applies it to a youth population in rural Georgia. Puff City is a successful NHLBI-funded study that targeted three key asthma management issues: 1) smoking; 2) controller medication adherence; and 3) carrying a rescue inhaler. Given the success of Puff City among mid-western, inner city youth, an important question is whether such a program can be transplanted and effective for youth living in a different environment, the rural south. Rural Georgia youth are at equal or greater risk from asthma symptoms as inner city, Detroit youth. (08/01/2009 - 05/31/2012)

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  • Puff City - OPD Recruitment Trial

    PI: Christine L. M. Joseph, PhD, MPH

    Puff City is a successful asthma management program for urban teenagers in Detroit high schools. This iteration of Puff City uses a pilot approach to test if Puff City was accessible and feasible in an ED setting. (07/01/2008 - 09/30/2008)

  • Puff City II

    PI: Christine L. M. Joseph, PhD, MPH

    This study builds on the success of Puff City 1 (PC1), an Internet-based, teen-focused asthma management program, and enhances the effects achieved in PC1 in several ways: 1) tests new theory- and empirically-based approaches to recruiting urban high school students, 2) enhances program content to address resistance to change and relapse, and 3) uses PC1 data to create participation and success profiles of the students who can then be differentially approached on the basis of these profiles in Puff City II. (04/01/2007 - 03/31/2012)

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  • Puff City I

    PI: Christine L. M. Joseph, PhD, MPH

    The goal of Puff City is to develop and evaluate a multimedia, tailored web-based asthma management program to specifically target urban high school students. The program uses tailoring, in conjunction with theory-based models, to alter behavior through individualized health messages based on the user's beliefs, attitudes, and personal barriers to change. The content of the Puff City computer program is based on recommendations for patient education made by the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program, and focuses on three core behaviors: controller medication adherence, rescue inhaler availability, and smoking cessation/reduction. The entire program is voiced over, to accommodate low literacy. (12/01/2001 - 06/30/2006)

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