Keyword: "conjoint analysis"

7 items were found with the keyword "conjoint analysis".

  • Improving Patient Decisions about Bariatric Surgery

    New

    PI: Nancy J. Birkmeyer, PhD , Amir A. Ghaferi, MD, MS

    Obesity is increasingly considered among the most important public health problems of our times. Bariatric surgery is arguably the only treatment that has proven effective in producing long-term weight loss for patients with morbid obesity. Bariatric surgery also results in resolution of obesity related co-morbid conditions, improvements in quality of life, and increased survival. There are currently four different bariatric surgical procedures in use: adjustable gastric banding, gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, and duodenal switch. Bariatric surgery is considered a highly preference sensitive medical issue. Existing decision aids in bariatric surgery are limited in that they provide information about the average comparative risks and benefits of the treatment options, but do not provide customized estimates of the risks and benefits of the different procedures for individual patients. As a result of these draw-backs, decision aids are not frequently used in making treatment decisions in bariatric surgery. Our proposal is highly innovative in that our decision support tool integrates data from a large clinical registry with individual patient data to provide patients with real-time, customized, accurate information regarding the risks and benefits of the treatment options to better inform decision making. This tool will be continuously updated to ensure that the data on risks and benefits that it provides are accurate and current. Our tool also provides information about other attributes of the treatment options that bariatric surgery patients and other relevant stakeholders feel are important for patients to consider in deciding whether and what type of bariatric surgery to have. The proposed research promotes shared medical decision making for patients who are considering bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity. If our intervention proves effective, it will result in improved decision quality and outcomes of care for patients. It may also result in improved efficiency of care to the extent that it serves to augment or guide communication between the patient and physician to promote shared medical decision-making. (09/01/2013 - 08/31/2016)

  • I Can Decide

    PI: Sarah T. Hawley, PhD, MPH

    Patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer face a series of complex decisions regarding locoreginal and systemic treatment. Currently many of these decisions do not meet the definition of a high quality decision, defined as one that is both informed (based on an accurate understanding of the treatment risks and benefits) and preference-concordant (consistent with the patient's underlying preferences). I Can Decide evaluates the impact of an innovative decision tool on locoregional and systemic therapy decision making for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. (07/01/2012 - 08/31/2017)

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  • Biostatistics and Measurement Core (CECCR1 and CECCR2)

    PI: Roderick J. A. Little, PhD

    The development and evaluation of effective behavioral interventions depends on valid, reliable measurements, efficient statistical design and data collection methods, and appropriate data analysis techniques. Accordingly, biostatisticians continue to play a pivotal role in research conducted by the CECCR2. Key personnel include Dr. Rod Little, Dr. Vijay Nair and Dr. Mick Couper. Each are senior and highly-respected statisticians and methodologists, who played active roles in the CECCR1 and continue to be actively involved in developing testable specific aims and appropriate statistical design and analysis for the Projects in CECCR2. All are already well versed in the complex statistical issues associated with developing effective tailored health interventions, such as fractional factorial designs, data imputation, and mixed models with random effects. (09/01/2008 - 08/31/2013)

  • Decider Guider - VA

    PI: Sarah T. Hawley, PhD, MPH

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent cancer in the U.S. Dept. of Veteran Affairs (VA) and the second most costly cancer. This study aims to increase the number of VA patients who complete a CRC screening. It integrates an innovative and flexible preference elicitation methodology, conjoint analysis, into a decision tool to help VA patients clarify their preferences for characteristics of CRC screening tests. (07/01/2008 - 03/31/2012)

  • Decider Guider - Primary Care

    PI: Sarah T. Hawley, PhD, MPH

    This study aims to increase the number of insured, primary care patients who complete a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. This study integrates an innovative preference elicitation methodology, conjoint analysis, into a decision tool to help primary care patients clarify their preferences for CRC screening tests. The two sites participating in this study also allow for a more racially/ethnically diverse audience than other Decider Guider studies. (06/09/2008 - 04/30/2012)

  • Breast Cancer Patient Educational Tool

    PI: Sarah T. Hawley, PhD, MPH

    For the past decade there has been debate around whether mastectomy or breast conserving surgery (BCS) with radiation is the "best" treatment for early stage breast cancer. The goal of this study is to develop and pilot test an interactive computer-based decision tool for improving patient knowledge about breast cancer treatment, and help elicit patients' preferences for treatment characteristics. (09/20/2007 - 08/31/2009)

  • CECCR - Center of Excellence in Cancer Communications Research

    PI: Victor J. Strecher, PhD, MPH

    The purpose of the University of Michigan Center of Excellence in Cancer Communications Research (CECCR) is to develop an efficient, theory-driven model for generating tailored health behavior interventions that is generalizable across health behaviors and socio-demographic populations. (09/01/2003 - 08/31/2008)