Keyword: "liver"

3 items were found with the keyword "liver".

  • Liver Transplant Organ Offer Tool

    PI: Michael L. Volk, MD, MSc, AGAF

    Each time an organ comes along, the physician and potential recipient must decide whether to accept that offer or wait in hopes that a better one will come along.  This decision is a high-risk one, as the wrong choice could mean death for the patient.  It is also a complex one.  Physicians must incorporate multiple donor factors, recipient factors, and donor-recipient interactions, as well as the local magnitude of organ shortage and various technical and logistical concerns.  In a series of studies, we have shown that decisions about organ quality vary widely by transplant center, are inconsistent with the available evidence, and are susceptible to cognitive biases and external forces such as policy changes and competition between centers. Thus, this process of decision-making could stand to be improved. We hypothesize that the availability of a point-of-care decision aid could improve the consistency and accuracy of organ acceptance decision. (05/01/2013 - 04/30/2015)

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  • Liver Quality Decision Aid

    PI: Michael L. Volk, MD, MSc, AGAF

    Organs available for transplantation are of varying quality. Patients awaiting transplant need to balance the risk of taking a lower quality organ to keep them alive versus the risk of dying while waiting for a transplant. This decision aid includes an exercise to help people decide the level of quality they might be willing to accept, given their specific risk of death in the next 3 months. (02/01/2010 - 12/31/2014)

  • iSTART

    PI: Emily MacDonald Fredericks, PhD

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressant medications is common among adolescent liver transplant recipients, and is a leading cause of chronic rejection and graft loss, particularly following the transfer from pediatric to adult-centered transplant care. There is a critical need to promote medication adherence in this high risk group. The objective of this project is to design and evaluate a tailored intervention delivered using web-based and cellphone text messages to promote medication adherence in adolescent liver transplant recipients who are transitioning from pediatric to adult-centered transplant care. The iSTART (Individualized Self-management Training for Adolescent/Young Adult Recipients of Transplantation) intervention is delivered using technology to reduce the time and access constraints often encountered with traditional adherence interventions. (11/01/2009 - 08/31/2016)